Are you having back pain with any of the following?

  • Severe pain, weakness or tingling in your leg(s).
  • Difficulty stopping urination or loss of control of bladder or bowels.
  • Unexplained fever, nausea or vomiting.
  • A history of cancer or unexplained weight loss.

We understand that you are experiencing one or more of the health issues that might be impacting your back pain.

We recommend that you discuss these health issues with your doctor before proceeding with this program.

Once you are cleared by your doctor to do this program, we hope it helps you find relief from your back pain.

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Infants and Toddlers

As a parent of a baby or toddler, you may have many questions about your young ones’ development. Whether your questions are about safety, nutrition, growth, development, or sleeping through the night, we’re here to help.

Normal Growth and Development: Infants and Toddlers [Read/Print full article]

Overview

Watching your child grow and change is one of the great pleasures of being a parent. 

Right before your eyes, infants evolve from tiny, helpless newborns to smiling, gurgling babies. Toddlers learn to walk, then run and climb. Their bodies and brains grow so fast, it seems you are buying bigger clothes and marveling at their latest tricks every week.

In addition to physical growth, there are several other main areas of development that include:

  • Emotional/social
  • Cognitive
  • Language
  • Motor skills
Developmental milestones

Young children accomplish certain developmental "milestones" over the course of the first few years. Rolling over, sitting up, saying a first word – these are all milestones that indicate that a child is developing normally. 

All babies are different and develop at their own special pace, so try not to worry if your little one is a bit earlier or later than others. It's also common for a child to develop in one area first and then catch up in others.

One of the most important reasons to keep up with all recommended well child visits is to ensure that your child is growing and developing normally.

If you have any concerns about your child's development, we encourage you to talk with your child's doctor or nurse practitioner.

Learn more about developmental milestones at each age with our Healthy Kids, Healthy Futures series. Developed by Kaiser pediatricians, this information can help you know what to expect at each age and stage of your child's development.

Types of Development

Children grow and change in several different areas:

  • Physical. These are the changes in your child's body that you can see – things such as growing taller and gaining weight. 
  • Social/emotional. These internal changes begin with early bonding. Eye contact, smiling, cuddling, and responding to your child's needs are all part of early emotional development and provide the foundation for close, trusting relationships.
  • Cognitive or brain development. Your baby's brain grows rapidly during the first years of life, building neurons (brain cells) that he or she will use for life.
  • Language. Starting with your new baby's first cries, he or she learns to communicate with you. Over time, babbling, listening, and imitating help babies begin to learn sounds, gestures, and words. Eventually, they put it all together into speech.
  • Motor skills. New abilities develop as your baby's muscles grow stronger and movements become more coordinated.
Many factors affect your child's development 

We know that multiple factors contribute to a thriving, healthy child, including: 

  • Genetics
  • Quality nutrition
  • Adequate sleep
  • Stimulation and play
  • A safe environment
  • Positive, trusting relationships 

Parents and caregivers play a huge role in supporting a child's development. Your love and attention are perhaps the most important factors in helping your child develop to his or her full potential. 

Temperament

Each baby is born with his or her own unique characteristics and traits, called temperament. Each child is different. Some whimper when they need attention, while others scream. Some lie still during diaper changes, while others wiggle about. Some babies are naturally mellow. Some have strong feelings about everything.

These behaviors show differences in temperament, which is your child's individual way of reacting to the world. 

Want to learn more about your baby or toddler's temperament? Check out www.PreventiveOz.org,* where you can fill out an online questionnaire about your child (for a small fee). You'll then receive information tailored to your baby's temperament traits and tips to help you adjust your parenting style to match your child's needs.

*The Preventive Ounce is a California nonprofit that helps parents see and manage the unique temperament of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. This online service was developed with the help of Kaiser Permanente's Department of Research. 

More resources

Temperament counseling and parenting classes are available at many of our medical centers. You can search for a class near you or ask your child's doctor or local Health Education Center staff for recommendations.

Additional References:

Monitoring Your Child's Development

One of the most important reasons to keep up with all recommended well child visits is to ensure that your child is growing and developing normally.

Learn more about developmental milestones at each age with our Healthy Kids, Healthy Futures series. Developed by Kaiser Pediatricians, this information can help you know what to expect at each age and stage of your child's development. 

If you have any concerns about your child's development, we encourage you to talk with your child's doctor or nurse practitioner.

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If you have an emergency medical condition, call 911 or go to the nearest hospital. An emergency medical condition is any of the following: (1) a medical condition that manifests itself by acute symptoms of sufficient severity (including severe pain) such that you could reasonably expect the absence of immediate medical attention to result in serious jeopardy to your health or body functions or organs; (2) active labor when there isn't enough time for safe transfer to a Plan hospital (or designated hospital) before delivery, or if transfer poses a threat to your (or your unborn child's) health and safety, or (3) a mental disorder that manifests itself by acute symptoms of sufficient severity such that either you are an immediate danger to yourself or others, or you are not immediately able to provide for, or use, food, shelter, or clothing, due to the mental disorder. This information is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of specific medical advice or care you receive from your physician or other health care professional. If you have persistent health problems, or if you have additional questions, please consult with your doctor. If you have questions or need more information about your medication, please speak to your pharmacist. Kaiser Permanente does not endorse the medications or products mentioned. Any trade names listed are for easy identification only.

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